No other LED light offers the brightness of freedom of IntelliBrite 5g

Pentair engineers have raced past competing LED lights in a number of ways.

  • IntelliBrite 5g technology makes use of the brightest LEDs available.
  • A superior reflector design assures more light is directed toward the pool bottom to further increase intensity and color effects, while minimizing glare.
  • IntelliBrite 5g lens geometry provides a choice of a wide angle light position for greater underwater coverage and reflection or a narrow angle light position for increased underwater light intensity and distance.
  • IntelliBrite 5g works with IntelliTouch or EasyTouch control systems, the ultimate choices in pool, spa and poolscape equipment automation. In effect, you transfer programming and control of IntelliBrite to a central system that controls all your other backyard and pool features.

IntelliBrite 5g is clearly the new standard in color-changing underwater lighting creativity and value.

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SmartPool Solar System

SmartPool’s SunHeater: Solar pool heating systems are the hottest selling systems in the industry. They are designed to provide optimum heating efficiency and are constructed for lasting durability. SmartPool solar systems are easy to install and can be mounted on a roof, rack or fence, or can simply be laid on the ground. systems are available to heat the smallest aboveground to the largest inground pool. In this age of environmental and economic conservation, it is more important than ever to offer your customers a SMART way to heat their pool. -SmartPool Solar Heating Systems.
Learn more at http://www.AmeriMerc.com/pool-solar-heaters.htm

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Swimming Pool Sale

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Chlorine Demand: Disappearing Chlorine Reading

In recent years the most frequently reported pool maintenance problem is the rapid loss of chlorine in pools, even when the water is balanced and crystal clear.
difficulty in holding a chlorine reading, particularly in the spring season, is the often the result of an unusually high chlorine demand that can require 5 – 10x normal shock treatment or more! the term “chlorine demand”, commonly used in the water treatment industry, describes the quantity of free chlorine needed to establish and maintain a chlorine residual (testable chlorine reading) in water for a day or longer. before focusing on chlorine demand as the reason for disappearing chlorine readings check a few basic factors: First, make sure the pH is at least 6.8. low pH will cause chlorine to become unstable in water, emerge as chlorine gas (ie. “gas off”) and be lost in the air. second, check the conditioner/stabilizer (cynauric acid) level. it is not usual for an unstabilized pool (less than 25 ppm of conditioner) to lose 2 – 4 ppm of chlorine per day. third, recognize that the warmer the water and the brighter the sun, the greater the rate of chlorine loss. it is estimated that biological growth nearly doubles for every twenty degree (20F) increase in water tempreature. all of these factors will make a huge impact on chlorine usuage. Effective filtration followed by filter cleaning or backwashing is also required before total chlorine demand can be considered. dead algaeand dead mircoorganisms are oxidized by chlorine as long as they are still in the water or trapped in the filter. the same is true for organic debris of all kinds. through vacuuming, filtering and removal of all particles from the system by backwashing the filter is a must. if both pH and conditioner readings are in range AND if the filter is clean AND the chlorine still disappears, then examine the recent history of the pool, including winterizing techniques and algae episodes.

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Chemistry Automation: Spend more time enjoying your pool and less time working on it.

WHY IS WATER CHEMISTRY IMPORTANT?

          Continuous filtration, cleaning and sanitization are not enough – balancing pH (potential hydrogen) is vital. Chlorination should keep germs and algae at bay but when pH is unbalanced, it can’t do its job. Let the pH drop too low and the water becomes acidic and attacks anything it touches. When pH drifts up, the water becomes alkaline and creates an environment where mineral deposits (scale) can form.
          Furthermore, when pH is high, chlorine becomes less oRP (oxidation reduction potential) measures the oxidizing capacity in water. it is a proven measurement and maintenance technology mandated for commercial pool sanitization.
          unlike most home-test processes, oRP is not fooled by the effects of pH, total Dissolved Solids (tDS) and other factors. most home-test kits and strips only report free chlorine and other less effective forms of chlorine. only oRP can deliver further detailed analysis of the more important free chlorine. it differentiates free chlorine’s components HoCl (hypochlorous acid) and oCi- (hypochlorite ion). oCi- is a slow-acting sanitizer, and HoCl is up to 300 times more effective. oRP targets HoCl, a more fine-tuned measurement of the effectiveness of chlorine and water quality.
          Studies have reported on the relationship between oRP and chlorine’s activity with germs and bacteria. they’ve concluded that oRP significantly predicts water bacterial quality better than other methods. As a result, in most states, the highly regulated commercial pool industry requires oRP testing.

WHAT IS BALANCED WATER?
         
           Water balance is composed of several key factors – pH, total alkalinity, calcium hardness and tDS. All of these factors are important, but none more so than pH. pH is a measurement of the concentration of hydrogen ions in water. it is measured using a logarithmic scale from 0 to 14, with pH 7 being neutral.
          For pool water to be in balance, all factors must be in their proper range. that range may vary slightly depending on the finish of the pool and the average temperature of the pool water. the one value that never changes is pH. it must be maintained between 7.2 and 7.8 for a pool to be considered “balanced.”

HOW TO ACHIEVE BALANCED WATER?
         
          Achieving optimal water quality can be time consuming and frustrating. most pool owners test their water daily and add the chemicals required to get and keep the water clean and in balance. Get it wrong, and you could swing the balance the other way, increasing your maintenance time and causing unnecessary chemical costs.

WHAT IF?
          What if your pool could self adjust, automatically test its own chemistry, and balance and sanitize your water? What if it always knew what the water needed and adjusted
continuously, eliminating unhealthy highs and lows? ensuring brilliant, balanced water all the time, automatically. you can get your water and maintenance time in balance with Sense.

SENSE AND DiSPENSE, CHEMISTRY AUTOMATION.

          this professional-grade oRP and pH Sense and Dispense technology was previously only available for commercial pools. Hayward now offers an economical approach, with the same level of accuracy, for residential pools. unlike others on the market, Sense and Dispense uses a proportional feed algorithm that continuously tests the water, sampling pH and sanitizer activity, and adjusting chemical feeding on a basis proportional to the demand. other approaches don’t sample the water often enough and release larger doses, which is far less effective and can create highs and lows similar to a manual approach.
          Adding Sense and Dispense to your Pro Logic®*, Aqua Plus® or Aqua Rite® Pro is a fully integrated solution – not an additional box that resides on your pool pad – eliminating additional installation costs. it also provides a single source for status reporting and control.
Sense and Dispense consists of two kits. the first kit senses pH and oRP levels and dispenses a self-renewing supply of pure chlorine generated from salt. pH dispense can be achieved using the second kit, which includes a manifold that connects to a Co2 tank. Co2 is highly effective in lowering pH. With salt-chlorinated pools, pH tends to drift up. Co2 reduces pH to recommended levels by forming H2Co3 (carbonic acid), a safe acid that does not require handling. As an alternative to Co2, Sense and Dispense also supports the Stenner Pump acid feed system – a proven solution and approach to chemical delivery. it’s robust, safe and reliable.

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Chlorine Demand: Disappearing Chlorine Reading

In recent years the most frequently reported pool maintenance problem is the rapid loss of chlorine in pools, even when the water is balanced and crystal clear.
Difficulty in holding a chlorine reading, particularly in the spring season, is the often the result of an unusually high chlorine demand that can require 5 – 10x normal shock treatment or more! The term “chlorine demand”, commonly used in the water treatment industry, describes the quantity of free chlorine needed to establish and maintain a chlorine residual (testable chlorine reading) in water for a day or longer. Before focusing on chlorine demand as the reason for disappearing chlorine readings check a few basic factors: First, make sure the pH is at least 6.8. Low pH will cause chlorine to become unstable in water, emerge as chlorine gas (i.e. “gas off”) and be lost in the air. Second, check the conditioner/stabilizer (cyanotic acid) level. It is not usual for an unstabilized pool (less than 25 ppm of conditioner) to lose 2 – 4 ppm of chlorine per day. Third, recognize that the warmer the water and the brighter the sun, the greater the rate of chlorine loss. It is estimated that biological growth nearly doubles for every twenty degree (20F) increase in water temperature. All of these factors will make a huge impact on chlorine usage. Effective filtration followed by filter cleaning or backwashing is also required before total chlorine demand can be considered. Dead algae and dead microorganisms are oxidized by chlorine as long as they are still in the water or trapped in the filter. The same is true for organic debris of all kinds. Through vacuuming, filtering and removal of all particles from the system by backwashing the filter is a must. if both pH and conditioner readings are in range AND if the filter is clean AND the chlorine still disappears, then examine the recent history of the pool, including winterizing techniques and algae episodes. A wide variety of pollutants, both organic and inorganic can be oxidized by free available chlorine and lower a chlorine reading. Some of the visible ones include decomposed leaves and debris, algae, fertilizers, bird droppings and contaminants in rain.
The longer those visible pollutants remain in the water, during a long winterization period, for example, the greater the likelihood that a high chlorine demand will occur in the spring.
The use of a solid winter cover to prevent visible pollution, brushing and vacuuming frequently and filtering constantly will remove much of the chlorine demand and save time and money spent on chemicals.
Even if all visible pollutants are quickly vacuumed or filtered and the water is crystal clear, soluble pollutants such as mineral ions, algae spores, bacteria, other microorganisms and inorganic and organic nitrogen compounds can use up large quantities of chlorine. Long such as nitrate phosphate, cyan rate or borate is not part of the list of the list of soluble pollutants and do not contribute to chlorine demand. The procedure to determine chlorine demand requires specific testing equipment. The idea is simple: Raise the chlorine level of the sample of water to be tested to a very high level, 100 ppm for example, wait up to 24 hours under controlled conditions, and retest the water sample for free chlorine, 20 ppm for example. The difference, 80 ppm, is the total chlorine demand.
Once the total chlorine demand has been established the choice of chlorine shock treatment can be made. Based on cost and control over the water balance the most wisely used shock treatment choice is hit hard, a full strength calcium Hypochlorite product. One pound of Nuclo hit hard (68% calcium hypochlorite) in 10,000 gallons of water imparts 8 ppm of chlorine to water. In the example above, 10 lbs. of hit hard would be required in 10,000 gallons of water to satisfy the chlorine demand and establish a chlorine reading. It is important to apply the entire dose over a few days time because the lab test in our example indicated the water used up 80 ppm in only 24 hours and the water needs the complete dose. If concerns over bleachable surfaces such as vinyl liners and fiberglass exist, the treatment can be spread over few days. If the shock treatment expense is judged to be too high, compare it to the cost of draining a large portion of the water and refilling with fresh water. If the structural integrity of the pool is doubtful or if fresh water is expensive or of poor quality containing minerals that will require sequestering treatments, then proceed with the required shock treatment. Now let’s consider role that nitrogen bearing pollutants have no chlorine demand, chloramines and breakpoint chlorination. Within the range of pollutants that make up chlorine demand, nitrogen, in all its forms including inorganic nitrogen (ammonia type) and organic nitrogen (amino acids and proteins) is the largest polluting group. Ammonia nitrogen reacts almost instantly with chlorine to form chloramines, a unique part of chlorine demand.
Disappearing chlorine readings can arise from the development of chloramines, requiring breakpoint chlorination. Chloramines develop slowly during the season and are routinely oxidized in 2-3 ppm of chlorine. If they build to higher levels then breakpoint chlorination is needed. There is a real difference between “chlorine demand” and “breakpoint chlorination.” Breakpoint chlorination only refers to the amount of chlorine needed to oxidize chloramines as determined by DPD testing. Chlorine demand can be dosed over a few days time but breakpoint chlorination must be dosed immediately. Use this simple calculation to determine breakpoint chlorination:
Chloramines level X 10= ppm of chlorine needed to achieve breakpoint chlorination.
For example, 2 ppm of chloramines requires 20 ppm of chlorine, about 2.5 lbs. of hit hard per 10,000 gallons of water. Retest the next day for free chlorine.
RECAP: avoiding the introduction of soluble and insoluble pollutants is the best way to minimize a high chlorine demand. The best advice is to keep water balanced and well sanitized to prevent algae, winterize carefully, and open early in spring. Proper use of algaecides, clarifies and mineral and stain control products will also help minimize the development of high chlorine demand. Remind: when using conquest reduce the chlorine level to 1 ppm or less to maximize the effectiveness of the treatment.

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IntelliBrite 5g Takes 2nd in Best Green Product Category of 2010 IPSPE Product Showcase

We were delighted to win 2nd place in the Best New Green Product category at the 2010 IPSPE Product Showcase for our new IntelliBrite 5g LED Color-Changing Pool Light. A great addition to our Eco Select brand line of green products, the IntelliBrite 5g uses 82% less energy than incandescent and halogen pool lights and nearly 50% less than competing LED pool lights.

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